Is it worth it?

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#1
So I was given a project. It is a free Grady but my question is, is it worth working on a boat that has a shit transom. Are they repairable?
 

Heyspike

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#2
It all depends on your capabilities, transoms are repairable. What year and model is the boat? Engines in good shape? When it's all said and done will it be worth the time and effort? Are you going to do the work yourself or have a professional do it?(cost). Lots of questions you have to ask yourself. In the long run--"Is it a boat you would like to keep and run"? Do a little soul searching and internet searching and you'll find your answer. If you do proceed make sure you share your journey here. The guys will help with questions along the way. Good Luck.
 

SkunkBoat

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#4
I poured a new transom on a V20. Video on youtube Transom part 1 Transom part 2
Spent about $2k and a lot of my time. It was worth it to me because I loved the boat and I love doing new and challenging things.
I had owned it for 15 years and over the years I had done things so it wasn't a wreck.

What is the rest of the boat like? Does it need stringers, a new fuel tank, a new deck? Is the gelcoat decent or does it need a paint job?
Will it be worth repowering when its done?

And the big question is... Are YOU going to USE it?
 
Likes: Rubytuesday
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#5
I do not know much about it yet. Let me get some info. I enjoy the challenge. It needs a motor so that is a expense. I guess I thought I could end up with a really nice boat for myself even if it takes me 5 years. And yes I would run it . I mean if all of the stuff needs replacing that you are asking how much will that cost? I am going to ask a lot of stupid questions if I do this I am sure. This is all pretty new to me.
 

Fishtales

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#6
You can certainly do it. There are many threads out there that detail the process (some here, some THT a guy named Jawz did a few of them and elsewhere). Really up to you if you have the time and skill.
 
Likes: Rubytuesday
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#8
Let me get some pictures. My brother used this boat to fish for years but is now a Captian and needed a larger boat. It has been out in the elements for years and it is just sitting there so I figured it's worth a shot.
 

UCPA111

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#10
So I was given a project. It is a free Grady but my question is, is it worth working on a boat that has a shit transom. Are they repairable?
I bought a seafarer for $2800. I did a total restoration on it - summer 2017 through spring 2018. Transom. Outboard. Engine bracket. Controls. Steering. All new wiring. Marine circuit panel installed. All new thru hulls. New fuel tank. New seats. It was a labor of love, that's for sure.

You can checkout some videos on my youtube page to see the progression of transom and such. I had a cutout transom and decided to make it full height. I used Coosa board and West System Epoxy as well as 1708 mat.

It's doable. The process takes some sweat equity and cash. Motor was $27K (all new drive by wire, Vessel view, binnacle, power steering, etc.) and then all the other stuff. I love it though. And, I know exactly what's in it....how it works...etc. I couldn't touch new one for what I put in it.

PM me if you have questions.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCATvLuuBWqIPmRX0gH9FiMQ
 
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#12
Thanks for the input. I will get some more details and try to figure it out. At this point I suppose it won't matter if it is in my backyard or his.
 

suzukidave

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#13
I follow the old saying "There is nothing more expensive than a cheap boat"
i have successfully defied that saying with every boat i have owned. it is all about looking before you leap, managing expectations, planning and shopping carefully and doing it yourself.
 

suzukidave

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#14
I do not know much about it yet. Let me get some info. I enjoy the challenge. It needs a motor so that is a expense. I guess I thought I could end up with a really nice boat for myself even if it takes me 5 years. And yes I would run it . I mean if all of the stuff needs replacing that you are asking how much will that cost? I am going to ask a lot of stupid questions if I do this I am sure. This is all pretty new to me.
my main thought on this is your motor plan. if you want a newer 4 stroke motor then don't put it on an ancient boat because the sum is worth less than the parts. if you are ok putting an older reliable 2 stroke motor on this boat then you can certainly put a transom on a free grady and come out ahead.

but there are also plenty of other cheap boats. a free boat needing a transom and motor is not necessarily a better deal than a $4-5k boat needing neither (even if it does not have the motor you want).

for me, there needs to be a plan and preferably an arbitrage advantage when you buy a cheap old boat. for example, i bought a 1970s era 14' runabout as a commuter for our cabin this summer because the hull is a classic that is still made, and the exterior was white on white and darn near perfect, but i also bought it because the price was very low due to everything else. it had the original faded (manual tilt) motor, rusty metal gas tanks, old school pitted chrome deck fittings, a tired orange interior and tiny rusty wheels on the trailer, which killed its curb appeal. i did the math on addressing those things and selling the motor and went for it. i was lucky enough to sell the motor right away. so the boat now owes me nearly nothing, needs mostly cosmetics and i have been slowly accumulating the stuff i need all winter.

a few other thoughts on a boat project

-is it the exact boat you would want or are you compromising?

-how much time do you have to give to the project? is that really enough?

-what work can you do yourself, and what part of that work do you like to do as opposed to stuff you can force yourself to do?

-how much grief will your spouse give you about it being in your yard and occupying your time?

-do you enjoy surfing message boards, reading, asking questions and learning?

-do you enjoy surfing ebay and boat supply places to get the best product and best price for all the little things?

-if you plan to pay people to do things, are you ok with being charged more than you think is fair and managing your expectations on quality, or will that give you heartburn?
 
Likes: Rubytuesday
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#15
my main thought on this is your motor plan. if you want a newer 4 stroke motor then don't put it on an ancient boat because the sum is worth less than the parts. if you are ok putting an older reliable 2 stroke motor on this boat then you can certainly put a transom on a free grady and come out ahead.

but there are also plenty of other cheap boats. a free boat needing a transom and motor is not necessarily a better deal than a $4-5k boat needing neither (even if it does not have the motor you want).

for me, there needs to be a plan and preferably an arbitrage advantage when you buy a cheap old boat. for example, i bought a 1970s era 14' runabout as a commuter for our cabin this summer because the hull is a classic that is still made, and the exterior was white on white and darn near perfect, but i also bought it because the price was very low due to everything else. it had the original faded (manual tilt) motor, rusty metal gas tanks, old school pitted chrome deck fittings, a tired orange interior and tiny rusty wheels on the trailer, which killed its curb appeal. i did the math on addressing those things and selling the motor and went for it. i was lucky enough to sell the motor right away. so the boat now owes me nearly nothing, needs mostly cosmetics and i have been slowly accumulating the stuff i need all winter.

a few other thoughts on a boat project

-is it the exact boat you would want or are you compromising?

-how much time do you have to give to the project? is that really enough?

-what work can you do yourself, and what part of that work do you like to do as opposed to stuff you can force yourself to do?

-how much grief will your spouse give you about it being in your yard and occupying your time?

-do you enjoy surfing message boards, reading, asking questions and learning?

-do you enjoy surfing ebay and boat supply places to get the best product and best price for all the little things?

-if you plan to pay people to do things, are you ok with being charged more than you think is fair and managing your expectations on quality, or will that give you heartburn?
Ugh. Well I am pretty sure I will be in over my head. It was not about it being a boat that I dreamed of or anything like that. I needed the distraction and am not afraid of the work and love to learn new things. It was going to be a learning experience. No husband to give me a hard time...lol