Tips - anchoring

RussGW270

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#1
Okay folks, I have to chat while I wait to pass the time lol

I have owned boats, but each “spoke” it’s own language and took it’s own twists and turns.

To that end, this boat’s length is not a big deal to me, but it’s weight and height are new to me. Setting an anchor will be important so I set it correctly, and am able to release it and get it back.

Don’t laugh, when I was kayaking, I was known for losing anchors lol.

So what are the tricks for this boat when it comes to the windlass? I usually have to throw it and pull it myself and I do not want to burn the windlass up.

Looking for training and not ashamed to ask.

I even would love to pay for an instructor that is experienced in this boat to go out with me and show me the ropes and go over safety tips.

Bass boats, bay boats...low profile boats, even a motor whale boat...I am okay with, but I would love some help learning to be safe with this one.

Thoughts?

Russ
 

DennisG01

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#2
The theory is all the same between big and small boats. All that changes is the size of the ground tackle, which if you have a windlass, you probably already have appropriate rode and anchor. The same general rules apply - roughly a 3:1 to 5:1 scope for normal anchoring... more scope if it gets windy. And, you can never really have enough scope so err on the side of longer is better. If the hook is dragging, let out more rode before pulling it up and resetting. You can paint your chain/rope every 20', or whatever works for you. There are also pre-made "flags" that get inserted into the rode and the flags have feet markings on them. Gotta be closer to see the flags, though.

Windlass use... it is NOT meant pull the boat back to the anchor, nor is it meant to take the strain while at anchor. Always tie off to a cleat when at anchor - although if it's dead calm, there's really no need. When it's time to retrieve, use the engines (which ideally should always be running when operating the windlass, anyways) to move the boat forward and the windlass then simply lifts the rode and anchor.
 

RussGW270

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#3
Okay, cool. Pretty much what I figured. I was not thinking you wanted the strain of waves pulling on that windlass. That helps.

Thanks a ton. The height of the boat, how it sits in the water compared to bays etc is where experience will help.

Believe it or not, heh, i love the ocean and since all I had was a bass boat once, I took it out of Port A and to the north jetty. I rode the wave and had many a stare, but it was about knowing your boat and “feeling” the water and we stayed safe and dry.

Would not do it again as bass boats make lousy seawater boats lol, but I love saltwater;)
 

DennisG01

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#4
You're welcome!

Height of boat... all that does is add to the scope needed, nothing to really worry about. Meaning, to "go by the book", you add the distance from the water to your cleat and add that to the depth of water. That's the number you use for scope.

Sometimes you learn real fast what NOT to do in small boats!
 

grady23

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#5
Most if not all windlass makers recommend that you DONT anchor using the windlass to hold position. ALWAYS tie of to a cleat. Just my $.02.
 

Fishtales

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#6
Couple of other things to consider.
- Chain from the anchor to line attach should be no less than the LOA of the boat. This allows the anchor to position itself correctly to bite in.
- Dennis is spot on with rode. 3:1 min, 7:1 usually max. Tie off the cleat and let a little more out so there is no force on the windlass.
- Get the right anchor for your area. Observe or ask what other folks with the same size/weight boat are using.
- When it is time to go, drive up on the anchor and let the windlass retrieve slack rode. Don't put pressure on the windlass to pull the boat. I find if you drive straight up vertical to the anchor you can usually pop it off the bottom and then pull it up.
https://www.boatingmag.com/how-to/using-anchor-ball
- There are some who pop the anchor a little more violently than I do.
 
Last edited:

Ozz043

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#7
Very few are game to ask and therefore bound to fail....well done
Some really good answers here, no need to really add :cool: