Fuel Tank Pad Material

Lite Tackle

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#1
I am looking for the rubber strips for mounting fuel tank on. Anybody know where to get this? I am ready to set a new aux tank (boat did not come with any one) and not sure what to place under it before securing. Any other ideas? Thanks in advance. Picture for reference only.
1575432839919.png Fuel
 

leeccoll

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#2
Closed cell neoprene is what I used. I purchased mine from my aluminum tank fabricator. Use 3M 5200 for securing the material to your coffin.
Patriot Marine Fabricating~Paul Spisak (609) 693-5542
You should google David Pascoe for installation tips.
And of course good luck!
Here was my layout... 20190625_172710.jpg
 
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DennisG01

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#4
Anything plastic or non-absorbent will work , as well (1/4"x2" FRP strips for example). The goal here is not necessarily about "padding" the tank (and, as noted, DON'T use rubber). It doesn't need it. The goal is to elevate the tank off the floor so there is air circulation so the the aluminum can self-protect itself. Whatever you use , glue it onto the tank before you install the tank. You need to make sure you fair the edges of the blocking - otherwise you run the risk of crevice corrosion.

Have you thought about getting a plastic tank? Hands down, that would be my choice. Especially for a smaller tank where you can likely find one that would fit your space without having it custom made.
 
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leeccoll

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#5
Just to clarify, closed cell neoprene is not rubber. It does not contain carbon that can damage the aluminum over time.

It also adheres better to the tank is what my fabricator told me vs something that is plastic. You want a good grip so the tank stays in place when it's full and you come down off plane quickly.

I did glue my neoprene strips down to the coffin floor vs the bottom of the new tank first because I have raised pads on my Grady, and the contours were not the same. I wanted the tank to be equally supported on all of them, so I made the "executive decision". Had the pads not been there, I agree gluing the 5200 and spacer material to the bottom of the new tank would be the best route.
 

seasick

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#6
Just to clarify, closed cell neoprene is not rubber. It does not contain carbon that can damage the aluminum over time.

It also adheres better to the tank is what my fabricator told me vs something that is plastic. You want a good grip so the tank stays in place when it's full and you come down off plane quickly.

I did glue my neoprene strips down to the coffin floor vs the bottom of the new tank first because I have raised pads on my Grady, and the contours were not the same. I wanted the tank to be equally supported on all of them, so I made the "executive decision". Had the pads not been there, I agree gluing the 5200 and spacer material to the bottom of the new tank would be the best route.
Let us know in 20 years how that held up!
 

Lite Tackle

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#8
Closed cell neoprene is what I used. I purchased mine from my aluminum tank fabricator. Use 3M 5200 for securing the material to your coffin.
Patriot Marine Fabricating~Paul Spisak (609) 693-5542
You should google David Pascoe for installation tips.
And of course good luck!
Here was my layout... View attachment 9917
What thickness neoprene did you chose? What about bulkheads? Hard to see in pic.
 

leeccoll

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#9
You can view my saga here:

https://www.greatgrady.com/threads/...and-fuel-lines-replacement.27425/#post-169215

I trusted Paul who custom fabricated a new main tank for my '87 Seafarer to give me the best advice for my installation.

Neoprene thickness I do not know, but it came in a 2.5" thick coil that you cut as needed. You should wipe it down with mineral spirits or the like to clean it before installation.

It was not very expensive. You can always call Paul (609) 693 5542 and find out the thickness he recommends, or just order a roll from him.

Bulkheads: 3/4 in. x 2-1/2 in. x 8 ft. Cellular PVC Trim I purchased at Home Depot.

If you look at the installation pictures and descriptions on my thread I think it will be easier to see what I did.

As many things in life, there are other ways to skin the cat, you just have to go with what makes the most sense for you.
 

DennisG01

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#10
I did glue my neoprene strips down to the coffin floor vs the bottom of the new tank first because I have raised pads on my Grady, and the contours were not the same. I wanted the tank to be equally supported on all of them, so I made the "executive decision". Had the pads not been there, I agree gluing the 5200 and spacer material to the bottom of the new tank would be the best route.
Ah, I understand better, now. The mounting surface was essentially uneven so the neoprene helps to take up the irregularities. That makes sense. I'd probably still be worried about possible crevice corrosion since there's no way to fair the 5200 between the neo and tank. Of course... trying to remove that tank down the road... since it's now essentially superglued to the hull... yikes! :) But that's neither here nor there at this point. Good luck!

What thickness neoprene did you chose? What about bulkheads? Hard to see in pic.
Keep in mind that Lee already has something built-in to raise the tank off the floor for air circulation which, again, is the primary reason. Using JUST the neo, in your case, would not be good.

Note on using "plastic" spacers: Yes, some plastic is not the best because glue doesn't stick to it well - HDPE, for example. But "plastic" is a very broad term and there are plenty of them out there that would MORE than serve the purpose - I gave one example above.
 
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Lite Tackle

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#11
Thanks all for the information. Looks like I will get the tank first and then see what I have to work with as far as thickness and location of material. Learned lot about closed cell neoprene in my searches. I can buy it in 2” wide strips, 1/16” to 1 1/2” thick and in densities of 20 duro to 80 duro.
 

DennisG01

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#12
Thanks all for the information. Looks like I will get the tank first and then see what I have to work with as far as thickness and location of material. Learned lot about closed cell neoprene in my searches. I can buy it in 2” wide strips, 1/16” to 1 1/2” thick and in densities of 20 duro to 80 duro.
If you can get it thick enough to allow for good air circulation, go for it. But if it gets expensive, don't bother - it's really not going to do anything for you that something else, much cheaper, would do. That said, I have no idea what it would cost.

Don't forget about plastic tanks - that would be an easier install and a longer lasting product.
 

Lite Tackle

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#13
Was looking at this moeller 58 gallon tank. Dimensions seemed just a bit off (18” H) and a lot of glasswork would be required. Fill seems high and could cause issues. Don’t know, something about a tank designed for the location appeals to me. Could save $400 on materials though.
1575561279211.png
 

Greyduk

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#14
LT, My 226 only has the main tank like yours. I have been considering adding the aux tank. What are the dimensions of the space for the aux tank. It would help me to know that since I do not have access to the boat now. I looked at Great Lakes Skipper yesterday. They have a large number of poly tanks in the 30-89 gallon capacity. Here is a link so that you might find one to fit.

https://www.greatlakesskipper.com/motors-and-parts/fuel-tanks/fuel-tanks-30-to-89-gallon
 

Lite Tackle

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#15
LT, My 226 only has the main tank like yours. I have been considering adding the aux tank. What are the dimensions of the space for the aux tank. It would help me to know that since I do not have access to the boat now. I looked at Great Lakes Skipper yesterday. They have a large number of poly tanks in the 30-89 gallon capacity. Here is a link so that you might find one to fit.

https://www.greatlakesskipper.com/motors-and-parts/fuel-tanks/fuel-tanks-30-to-89-gallon
1575563531623.png
 

Lite Tackle

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#17
Fill hose comes in from starboard side on bow end. That tank has the fill on port or flipped at stern end.
I really like having the connection and sender available from existing inspection plate. The made to stock (but .125 thickness) aluminum tank is close to the same price as that after delivery (my quote local is $900).
I got 20years out of the stock main and is still going (knock on wood), if I get that out of the new aux., I’m happy.
 

leeccoll

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#18
Fill hose comes in from starboard side on bow end. That tank has the fill on port or flipped at stern end.
I really like having the connection and sender available from existing inspection plate. The made to stock (but .125 thickness) aluminum tank is close to the same price as that after delivery (my quote local is $900).
I got 20years out of the stock main and is still going (knock on wood), if I get that out of the new aux., I’m happy.
I was fortunate enough to get 32 years outta mine. Probably pure luck, but I'm happy I replaced it before it started leaking.
Wishing you the best on your project!!