GW 232 trailer info needed.

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#1
I've got a 1988 Gulfstream 232 with twin Merc 4stroke 150's on a custom aluminum pod (keeps the motors out of the water). I need a trailer and needed help on the sizing of a trailer for her. I know a dual axle, hydraulic over electric is the standard, but what about weight capacity? What's the minimum trailering weight I should be looking at? 8,000lbs.?
 

magicalbill

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#2
I've got a 1988 Gulfstream 232 with twin Merc 4stroke 150's on a custom aluminum pod (keeps the motors out of the water). I need a trailer and needed help on the sizing of a trailer for her. I know a dual axle, hydraulic over electric is the standard, but what about weight capacity? What's the minimum trailering weight I should be looking at? 8,000lbs.?[

My 232 & trailer was 10,100 lbs. The boat had twin 200's and I always towed with full fuel, coolers, gear, etc. The trailer I had was originally equipped with 5k axles, giving it a 10K cap. I blew bearings and had way too many breakdowns as I towed the rig from Michigan to Fla and points in between.

I upgraded to 7K axles on the advice of a friend and my reliability dramatically increased.

So.. my trailer weighed 1900 lbs empty. Subtract that from the total weight of 10,100 lbs and the Gulfstream weighed in at 8200 lbs. The total weight of 10,100 lbs on a 14K Cap trailer made sense to me.

Your boat will likely weigh less with 150's and if you tow with less fuel. ( I never cared, I just filled the tank up and took off.). That said, I would overbuild your trailer or look for one that already is. I learned the hard way that running close to cap on the trailer was a bad idea.

In your case, I would opt for a trailer with a 12K cap, minimum. You WANT a comfortable cushion to work with so your not running on the edge of your limits.
 

artodea

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#3
I bought one through my local Grady dealer and let them spec it out for my 232 (single 300). What I got was a LoadRite 25' aluminum bunk trailer with the optional target bunks (bow), tandem axle, hydraulic disk brakes on both axles, 8,400 lb capacity with torsion spring suspension. It fits perfectly and tows like a dream.

 

Mr.crab

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#4
Previous owner of my Marlin blew an axle, he upgraded to 3-7000 lbs from 5000 lbs. A Marlin comes ln
at 7000 lbs plus motors,fuel, gear, and trailer, 15000 lbs trailer wasn’t enough.
 

Parthery

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#6
An 8600 lb tandem is the perfect size. What you are getting at that level is 2 5200 lb axles (10400) and the trailer itself will weigh around 1800 lbs or so.
 

grady23

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#10
Bought my trailer from NEXTRAIL in Florida. Gave me a great deal. Trailer is still in great shape and was purchased in 2001. I bought a 7k unit , but should probably gotten a 8-10k. electric over Hydraulic is ideal. Some states no longer allow surge brakes so be sure and check. Biggest problem with surge brakes is they only activate when the weight of the trailer pushes forward on the tongue of the trailer. This can be tricky to deal with if you hit the brakes once your deep in to a hard curve. It will tend to push a tow vehicle's back end around. BTW -- Opt for the disc brakes.