Islander Trailer Setup

Oceantroller

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Sorry about the confusion. Those 3 pictures at the start of this post are my boat. I couldn't figure out how to put a photo in a PM so I started a new thread.

My trailer is a Sea Lion S-28T-8200BB. Purchased December of 2013. Tires upgraded. I run LOADSTAR ST225/75R-15" RADIAL Tire, Load Range E at 80 psi.

From another post I wrote RE: Towing Grady with Jeep
I tow my 268 Islander from Cape May NJ to Islamorada and back every winter for the last 14 years. Same truck - 2007 Ford F150 with 9,000 lb towing capacity. Boat is 4,700 lbs, Yamaha F150's - 470 lbs each, trailer estimated 1,000 lbs, fuel usually light but lets say 75 gallons at 7 lbs = 525 lbs. Total 7,165 and with gear and household stuff it's close to 9,000 lbs. 24 hours seat time, 1,300 miles, 9 mpg around 60 mph +/- 5 MPH, locked out of overdrive. A little slow getting up to speed but easy drive. You can almost forget the boat is back there.

Trailer specs:

Dimensions​

Overall Length 30'-8"
Length Boat: 26-28
Overall Width 101
Frame Type 5x3
Transom Height to Bow eye, Min: 21'-6" | Max: 26'-6"

Capacities​

Cargo Capacity 8200 lbs

Wheels & Tires​

Tires, Rear Specification Minimum: ST225/75D15D

Chassis​

Axle Count Tandem Torsion
If you have radial tires the trailer will sway much easier than with bias tires
 

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My last rig was set up the same way with radials and towed beautifully in the worst conditions. There is something more happening than the tires.
 

seasick

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I would like to know how the tongue weight was measured and what that figure was.
 

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I would like to know how the tongue weight was measured and what that figure was.
Last I checked it was 625 lbs on my $1700 digital calibrated scale. Good enough?:p
 
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Hookup1

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I'll try to get a tongue weight for you tomorrow. I have a scale. I did increase the tongue weight on the trailer after the first year/trip. I moved the boat as far forward as possible up to the forward cross beam. It did help dial it in. Same with E-rated radials.
 

DennisG01

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Last I checked it was 625 lbs on my $1700 digital calibrated scale. Good enough?:p
That's certainly good enough for me!

Just checking though... you measured at the ball coupler, right? Not the tongue jack? Meaning, set the coupler down on a length of 4x4 (for example) placed vertically between the ball coupler and the scale that allows the trailer frame to be perfectly level.
 

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Perfectly level? No. Within an inch? Yes
I weighed it at a point less than 3" behind the center of the ball coupler.
 

wrxhoon

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To me looks like you have too much load behind the rear axle and not enough load on the tow ball. Could be lots of other things as well , like tyres on the limit trailer on the limit ( or above), incorrect tow ball height that will put more load on either axle . The trailer should sit level when hooked up on level ground.
Have a look at these videos :
 

glacierbaze

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I would think that having that long of a lever arm behind the axles, with two big outboards on the very end of it, would cause large variations in tongue weight at the hitch every time you hit a bump or dip in the road.
 

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I would think that having that long of a lever arm behind the axles, with two big outboards on the very end of it, would cause large variations in tongue weight at the hitch every time you hit a bump or dip in the road.
See post #11. The wrong horse is being beaten! :)
 

glacierbaze

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It may not be causing your issues, but I still think that it happens when the wheels are that far forward. I wasn't going to bring horses into this thread, but it did have me thinking of the difference between boat and horse trailers, where the wheels on the smaller trailers are as far back as they can put them. ;)
Hookup's set up works for his boat, but you are comparing a galvanized steel, box beam trailer, to an aluminum I-beam, with longer bunks, and different cross members, so I wouldn't expect them to give the same ride, or have the exact same load placement.
 
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Fire93Medic

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The only full side photos I have in my phone. We had this on a 7k tandem trailer for a 24'ish boat. We knew the trailer was way too small but we planned on just moving a few miles from ramp once a year and we already had the trailer. Although the boat was long for the trailer it fit surprisingly well enough and decided to try towing an hour to our primary residence but it was all over the road above 60mph.

Found this Load Rite 10k GVW trailer, it a little oversized in length but it tows great. Your trailer looks similar to our first trailers setup, I think I had too much weight forward.

New Trailer.jpg

Old Trailer.jpg
 

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Made my way out to the other garage today to check what tires I have. Load range "D", 65 psi max.
Here is the head scratcher: pressure on both tires on one side were 50 psi, but it was 25⁰ in the building. When I put the trailer away I remember upping the air a little for winter storage. My old trailer was 50 psi max. Now I'm wondering if I had a senior moment and had all my tires set to 50 psi?! If I did, then that really sucks because I have likely damaged these tires by having them under inflated. However, every galvanized wheel I've ever had slowly leaked, so they could have leaked down from 65 psi when I first put it away after getting hurt back in September. Hmm. Looks like I'll need to give it a go in the spring at 65 psi and see how it handles.
 

Hookup1

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I have had at least two defective galvanized rims. Both leaked where the spokes joined the rim. Your tires are probably ok. Look at the wear. Depending on how far you are towing they may be ok.
 

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The tires have less than 1k miles. Wear is not an issue, but overheating them could be. I would like to think I would have noticed. I always check tire and hub temps on long hauls. Never noticed anything out of the ordinary. I'll have to see how things go in the spring.