New Owner Sailfish 274 Bow Pulpit Smaller Slip fee Mod

Kovito

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#1
Hey Guys, I am a new owner of a Grady Sailfish 274 and have been out 9-10 times and really enjoy the boat.

I am changing harbors closer to me and if I can get the boat under 28 1/2 foot I can save just over $200 per month in slip fees to dock in a smaller slip.

My question is the bow pulpit I have on my 2000 Sailfish 274 adds a good 2-2.5 foot longer than the bow of the hull. I am thinking of removing and replacing with a roller or hardware to make the boat only as long as the bow of the hull. I will save the pulpit in case I ever want to add on. This looks like it will just barely get by at 28 foot and change.

Any thoughts on doing this? Is it easy and a good idea? Any recommendations on rollers or hardware that wont let the anchor extend past the bow?

I figure to save $2400 a year it is worth looking into.

Thanks!
 

DennisG01

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#2
Can you post a couple pictures of your setup? That would make easier for those of us that don't have your exact boat. But... does your boat have a rail that follows the pulpit? What are your plans for shortening that?

I have often wondered why the pulpits on some boats are so long. Maybe it's so they can get the entire anchor hanging below the pulpit for less chance of interfering with lines?

Windline is a good company to look at for anchor rollers - well made products. Less expensive (a little lesser quality, but not "bad", though) is Sea Dog. Take a look at their websites.
 

Kovito

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#3
Rails look easily removable with a small screw where the pulpit ends on both sides....


pulpit.JPG
 

DennisG01

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#4
Does that mean that the rail is not all one piece? If that section that is forward of the forward-most stanchion is a separate piece, that makes it easier - otherwise you need to cut it... which makes reassembly a little more challenging. Be sure to plug the (now) open ends. I have a feeling, though that getting rid of that forward section of railing is going to compromise the structure/stability of the remaining two (port/starboard) parts. You should consider adding a piece of rail to re-connect the two parts - which of course will end up being a bit in the way up there, but it is what it is.

That pulpit is definitely longer than it needs to be. Make sure you don't go too short with the new anchor roller as you don't want the anchor banging into the bow keel on retrieval. Some boats have the anchor mounted very close to the bow, but their bow keel angles backwards at a shallower angle.
 

Kovito

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Does that mean that the rail is not all one piece? If that section that is forward of the forward-most stanchion is a separate piece, that makes it easier - otherwise you need to cut it... which makes reassembly a little more challenging. Be sure to plug the (now) open ends. I have a feeling, though that getting rid of that forward section of railing is going to compromise the structure/stability of the remaining two (port/starboard) parts. You should consider adding a piece of rail to re-connect the two parts - which of course will end up being a bit in the way up there, but it is what it is.

That pulpit is definitely longer than it needs to be. Make sure you don't go too short with the new anchor roller as you don't want the anchor banging into the bow keel on retrieval. Some boats have the anchor mounted very close to the bow, but their bow keel angles backwards at a shallower angle.
Correct separate pieces for the rails. I will need one piece for the middle section once removed the extended rails. Is there an option to have the roller / anchor no farther out than the bow as Im creeping on the 28.5 foot Max slip length. Are there folding or retractable rollers and anchors?
 

journeyman

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#6
I am changing harbors closer to me and if I can get the boat under 28 1/2 foot I can save just over $200 per month in slip fees to dock in a smaller slip.

My question is the bow pulpit I have on my 2000 Sailfish 274 adds a good 2-2.5 foot longer than the bow of the hull. I am thinking of removing and replacing with a roller or hardware to make the boat only as long as the bow of the hull. I will save the pulpit in case I ever want to add on. This looks like it will just barely get by at 28 foot and change.

Does the marina you're moving to measure LOA with engines raised. Mine does. I don't know the exact length of a 274, but it seems to me that even with the pulpit removed it would measure more than 28.5 feet to the tip of the skeg. Even with the pulpit removed, the anchor will still stick out a measurable distance.
 

Kovito

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#7
Good point. Mine is a single outdrive from a Volvo Penta inboard diesel. I'll measure this week but remember it ending up right around 28' and change without bow pulpit.
 

DennisG01

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#8
Correct separate pieces for the rails. I will need one piece for the middle section once removed the extended rails. Is there an option to have the roller / anchor no farther out than the bow as Im creeping on the 28.5 foot Max slip length. Are there folding or retractable rollers and anchors?
Personally, I have never seen a retractable anchor roller. But that's not to say there isn't one... or you couldn't fab one. I imagine it would be kinda clunky looking as the entire anchor would have to sit on top of the bow deck.

Looking at the picture again... I think I see why the pulpit is so long. It's because of the design of the foredeck and how close the windlass is to the bow. There doesn't appear to be much room between the anchor swivel and the windlass. Meaning, if you went through with removing the pulpit and using an anchor roller, maybe you could end up saving a foot of length.

Have you thought about foregoing the roller all together and just go back to manually throwing the anchor out and retrieving? If you're that close on length, getting rid of the windlass might be your only solution. You can either store the anchor in the anchor locker (build a bigger hatch if needed), or store it in chocks on deck. If the weight of the anchor is an issue, look into a Fortress. So it may come down to "Windlass or $1,200" :)
 

journeyman

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#9
Have you thought about foregoing the roller all together and just go back to manually throwing the anchor out and retrieving? If you're that close on length, getting rid of the windlass might be your only solution. You can either store the anchor in the anchor locker (build a bigger hatch if needed), or store it in chocks on deck. If the weight of the anchor is an issue, look into a Fortress.
I store my fishing anchor, a Danforth style , in a Windline anchor holder on my bow rail. Eliminate the roller all together. you would have to attach the rode to use it but I guess it depends on how much you anchor and if it's worth the extra slip fee.

http://www.discountmarinesupplies.c...MIiYzcovzM3wIVFQOGCh0bnQGlEAQYEiABEgIplvD_BwE

I put a piece of tight fitting tubing over the shank to keep it from marring the fiberglass.
 

seasick

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#10
Hey Guys, I am a new owner of a Grady Sailfish 274 and have been out 9-10 times and really enjoy the boat.

I am changing harbors closer to me and if I can get the boat under 28 1/2 foot I can save just over $200 per month in slip fees to dock in a smaller slip.

My question is the bow pulpit I have on my 2000 Sailfish 274 adds a good 2-2.5 foot longer than the bow of the hull. I am thinking of removing and replacing with a roller or hardware to make the boat only as long as the bow of the hull. I will save the pulpit in case I ever want to add on. This looks like it will just barely get by at 28 foot and change.

Any thoughts on doing this? Is it easy and a good idea? Any recommendations on rollers or hardware that wont let the anchor extend past the bow?

I figure to save $2400 a year it is worth looking into.

Thanks!
I am curious about the policy if one that requires a longer slip. Assuming that you are going to shorten the boat by 2 feet or so, what's the issue with getting the smaller slip and have the pulpit stick out over the end, or depending on how the boat will be positioned in the slip, have the motors stick out a bit?
Perhaps the spacing of the opposing slips is the issue and they don't want boats sticking out into the lane. I would just ask what the policies are.

$200 a month extra sounds like a lot to me. The major cost of slip real estate is width more so than length. Are the longer slips also wider?
 

SkunkBoat

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#11
I had a Lewmar pivoting anchor roller on my V20 that really worked well. You might get away with one of those. It will stick out a little bit depending on where you can mount it and still pivot.
I don't have it anymore so I can't measure for you. In these pix the roller is tilted because the anchor is not in place. Looks like only a few inches overhang. When the anchor is in place and held up tight it sticks straight out. IMG_0272.jpeg fullsizeoutput_316a.jpeg
Skunkboat Sunrise_20091109_002.jpeg
 
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DennisG01

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#12
you would have to attach the rode to use it but I guess it depends on how much you anchor
Another option is to remove the windlass (not hard) and use a hawse pipe to feed the rode into the locker. Depending on the current hole size in the deck, might have to cut a starboard cover plate, then attach the hawse pipe to the starboard.
 

journeyman

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#13
Another option is to remove the windlass (not hard) and use a hawse pipe to feed the rode into the locker. Depending on the current hole size in the deck, might have to cut a starboard cover plate, then attach the hawse pipe to the starboard.
Might work. You would have to secure chain to keep it from flopping around. We all know windlasses and anchor lockers let in an awful lot of rain water, a hawse pipe is wide open though. Could present a problem.
 

DennisG01

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#14
Might work. You would have to secure chain to keep it from flopping around. We all know windlasses and anchor lockers let in an awful lot of rain water, a hawse pipe is wide open though. Could present a problem.
Agree. If his boat has a center cleat, he could use that to secure the anchor/chain. If not, a chain tensioner can be added. I'd still secure the anchor to a cleat for good measure, if even just loosely. For the hawse pipe, I was thinking of the kind with a lid - the opening in the base is raised off the deck so deck water doesn't wash in, and when the lid is down it does a very good job of keeping rain out (but still allows the rode to pass through). Although, maybe I was using the wrong terminology - it may just be called a deck pipe.
 
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#15
I also have a size restriction on my slip. When looking at boats last year, I looked hard at 330's however with the pulpit it would be too long for my slip. I actually put a call into Grady about removing the pulpit to decrease the LOA. They made it sound like it was going to be a much bigger deal then just unbolting the pulpit and taking it off. Apparently it is glued down well, and removing it will most likely involve some damage to underlying gelcoat and fiberglass. This would be in addition to the other problems discussed above. I never went through with it, just thought I would pass on the information.
 

Fishtales

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#16
just be careful. they will probably snap a line from the tips of you OB to the end of the pulpit. it wouldn't be nice if you did all this work and they find a way to put the screws to you anyway.....