Replacing snaps and removing screws

RussGW270

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#1
I tried to remove the hardware from the bimini and radar arch. There were screws that just spun vs coming out. I may need to drill them out, but they are stainless...blech.

Also put the cockpit cover on and there were a few broken snaps as well as some that just did not reach. How easy is it to replace a broken snap on the hull?

0741EE3A-2F12-4AA3-8512-61AB8E5DB5B1.jpeg
 

Fishtales

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#2
I've filled with marine tex and then re-drilled. I put a little 4200 on the screw and surface that mates with the gel coat. Have not had one pull out. Use a snap tool to stop pullouts.
 

RussGW270

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#3
Never done a snap. Looking at them, is it just like a rivet...? .....i.e. you have a tool, drill a hole, and squeeze the grips to compress a button into a pre-drilled hole?

I am probably going to get a custom cover after the new top so, rather than replacing the snaps, might be just as well to remove the ones around the cockpit and repair the holes as those will connect to the top later anyways.
 

seasick

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#4
I tried to remove the hardware from the bimini and radar arch. There were screws that just spun vs coming out. I may need to drill them out, but they are stainless...blech.

Also put the cockpit cover on and there were a few broken snaps as well as some that just did not reach. How easy is it to replace a broken snap on the hull?

View attachment 7272
Are you referring to the cap or the stud? The studs are either screwed in or if in the slots on the windshield, just slipped in. There are two different sizes of the slip in sliding posts depending on the spacing of the slots in the windshield frame.

Studs are easy to replace. As mentioned, if the hole is too big, fill it with MarineTex or similar, let dry and drill a small pilot hole.
The caps on the other hand are a bit more work. The old ones need to be drilled out from the underside. New ones can be installed using a cheap die and stamp rod (works OK but doesn't last too long) , a vice grip type of press ( about $50) or the pro clamp model which runs about $130. I use the vice Grip style model and it works well. The downside is that if installing snaps in new material, you have the pre-punch the 1/8 inch hold for the pin. The pro model punches as it compresses the pin.

The snaps that don't reach may just be shrinking of the canvas . The windshield studs can be slid as needed if that is the issue with not reaching. Marine shops sell snap extenders also. They are short pieces of material with a cap om one end and a stud on the other.
 

DennisG01

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#5
Spinning screws... the threads near the head of the screw have stripped. You need to get the next, good threads to bite. Using a screwdriver or a screwgun, alone, won't work because you're applying pressure the wrong way. Try using pliers and PULL the screw head as you unscrew it. Can also try wedging the screw head away as you use a hand screwdriver. FYI... if you initially used a screw gun, that could have caused the issue - it's best to start with a hand screwdriver.

Try wetting the cover really well - see if you can then reach the snaps.

You have a broken snap on the HULL? Are you sure that's what you meant to say? That's a strange thing to happen - the male side of snaps don't really "break".
 
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seasick

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#6
You can make a tool from a inexpensive metal scraper by cutting./filing/ grinding a slot in the blade just wide enough to allow the shaft of the screw to fit. Slide the tool under the screw, apply upward pressure and then use a screw gun to remove the screw. If you have enough clearance you can also use a small nail pry bar. They are about 3/4 inch wide and 6 inches long. They already have a V ground in the ends to allow one to pry up a nail.

In the worst case, you can cut off/grind off the screw head and push the remaining shaft into the tube. Of course the old piece will be laying in the tube but who is going to tell:)