Sailfish Windlass Wiring

fellinger

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#1
I read on the original 1995 catalog for the 272 Sailfish that it has wiring for the windlass. Can anyone confirm that a wire is pre-run to the bow?

Thanks,

Fred
 

seasick

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#2
fellinger said:
I read on the original 1995 catalog for the 272 Sailfish that it has wiring for the windlass. Can anyone confirm that a wire is pre-run to the bow?

Thanks,

Fred
perhaps ypu should call Grady and ask. I am sure they have the wiring diagrams and might be able to tell you if it was prerun, where it was dropped off and what color it is.
 

ROBERTH

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#3
Mine had it there factory installed. I was able to find it rolled up and labelled near where the batteries are located. Also, was able to reach around under the deck in the anchor locker area and find the other end.
 

ocnslr

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#4
Our 2002 Islander was prewired from the helm area to the bow.

But when I asked GW where they get a power source they said the general house feed at the helm. That was just a bad answer, as the feeder coming forward is not heavy enough and had a 40-amp breaker protecting it.

That type of installation is the reason owners complain about their electronics all restarting when they use the windlass.

I recommend you install a suitably sized breaker aft and run a dedicated feed forward to the helm. Depending on the size of the windlass, you may be able to use the factory prewiring to run the rest of the way forward.

Brian
 

ROBERTH

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#5
Seems they did it a couple of ways.

For me, being the cables were already at the rear transom area next to the batteries, I mounted the 50 amp breaker on the transom. Connected a short 2 gauge positive feed to the breaker and the other side with the cable running forward. Ground cable direct to ground battery terminal. I installed the solenoid under the deck inside the anchor locker where I could get to it and connected the cables to it. Then the wiring to the windlass from the solenoid. I ran the switch wires to the helm and installed the switch. Pretty easy install.

I have since, over this winter relocated my house batteries under the mid berth area behind the panel to get some weight shifted forward. So I pulled the cables forward for the windlass and also the breaker and put them to the house batteries. This is a much shorter run now to the windlass, but I wasn't having any issues before with the longer run as long as I started motors before running the windlass which was highly recommended by Lewmar.

I have the Yamaha aux. charging wires running to the 2 house batteries to keep them charged up. I did use the AGM batteries being the location they are so I would minimize any fumes/acid issues from a typical wet cell.

This battery move helped me as I put her on the local lake this weekend for a test and I can now see my scuppers 1/2 way above the water line now and they were below with all 4 batteries in the transom.

I am telling you all of this to consider batteries, connections, weight, etc. I started with 2 group 24 batteries when I purchased, then went to 3 batteries, then to 4, then to 2 AGM's and then relocation. A lot of work changing stuff around, but so far, always an improvement. Hope this helps.....
 

ocnslr

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#6
Four batteries under aft seat. Twin F150s. Cockpit scupper drains completely above the waterline. :D

Of course, the 22# Delta anchor, the 12H Danforth and the Lewmar 700 windlass on bow, plus the Mermaid Marine Air 6,500-BTU A/C under the galley all help to set the trim, eh.
 

ROBERTH

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#7
Feedback on the weight distribution I did with the batteries.
Ran offshore this past weekend while over a 100 boats were going out for the Big Rock Tournament. A washboard for over 30 miles for sure.

The handling and ride was much improved. It seems it is not so aft heavy now and rides more in the mid section with less tab. I was happy with this upgrade!
We also took off the 22 lb. anchor, cut back from 30' of chain to 20' and put the 13 lb anchor back on to reduce some weight up front on the pulpit. The smaller anchor was holding just as well as the heavier one in some strong currents and 4' seas.

Fred, How is your project going? Are you installing a windlass?
 

Fire93Medic

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#8
I am going through this now on my 1999 Sailfish. They ran a heavy 4 awg wire from the batteries to the helm, then what looks like 8awg wires from the helm to the bow.
 

ocnslr

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#9
Fire93Medic said:
..... then what looks like 8awg wires from the helm to the bow.
That's what I was referring to. Undersized for any decent windlass. You can run a heavier wire or a parallel 8awg. Undersized wire = voltage drop = more current pulled by motor = tripped breakers, or shortened motor life.
 

seasick

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#10
ocnslr said:
Fire93Medic said:
..... then what looks like 8awg wires from the helm to the bow.
That's what I was referring to. Undersized for any decent windlass. You can run a heavier wire or a parallel 8awg. Undersized wire = voltage drop = more current pulled by motor = tripped breakers, or shortened motor life.
Not necessarily undersized for the windlass mentioned. The manufacturer specs calls for a 40A breaker and that means that the actual load should be less than 40 but lets assume it is 40 amps. The 8 ga wire will be OK for up to 40 feet+ of round trip length given an allowed 10% voltage drop. That means that if the 8s are within 20 feet of the relay where the larger feeds attach, you are fine. In addition, the windlass will not generally draw full current during normal operations. The max will occur during stall conditions ( that would be a stuck anchor and you shouldn't be using the windlass motor to unstick an anchor). Bigger is necessarily better in this case.
 

ocnslr

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#11
Sorry, but I didn't see a specific windlass mentioned.

I assumed it would be something more substantial than the Horizon 400 or 500 originally installed. e.g. the Lewmar 700 or 1000 series.
 

seasick

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#12
ocnslr said:
Sorry, but I didn't see a specific windlass mentioned.

I assumed it would be something more substantial than the Horizon 400 or 500 originally installed. e.g. the Lewmar 700 or 1000 series.
I understand. My original thought was also that the new windlass would draw more current.
When I looked up the specs for the new and the old, I saw that the wiring was probably fine.
Sometimes you get lucky.